Workflow with Sente, Devonthink, Scrivener using Hazel and Dropbox as glue: part 1

Since I want to follow up informations on the internet on a few applications that I am interested in,  I have setup  google alerts for tracking  blog posts and articles into my email inbox. Under my Devonthink tag, today I get this small visual workflow in a website called Pinterest.

workflow

I have never visited Pinterest before; but the visual illustration looks beautiful.  There is no explanation on how to build the workflow in the visual maps; but the illustration is elegant, something I have been planning to design. Since this is the  workflow  what I am already using it for the last year, it seems good idea to put how I put these different apps to work together to have the “virtually perfect” kind of workflow for my research (phd dissertation, I am starting soon). I have already written short articles in my previous posts on  some of the connections I made between these four majestic apps. In this extended post, I will demonstrate how I developed my workflow using Sente, Devonthink, Scrivener, nvALT, xMind, Sublime Text and ultimately Latex. Hazel, the Automator, Dropbox and Keyboard Maestro are the core glues of the workflow. I will spell out how each app works together with the other applications to great a coherent and elegant workflow.

Now, have a loot at a pictorial overview of the workflow we will have by the end of this series.

research workflow
Click for larger preview

In the next few series, I will try to explain each step of the workflow; how I develop the connections and how the tools chosen talk to each other to build a solid workflow. (I didn’t represent Hazel in this drawing mainly because the tasks of Hazel. The role of Hazel  will be clear by the end of the post)

Let me start from the app I use to gather resources for research: Sente.

# Sente

For me, the most important organization burden is lifted by Sente. Sente has four crucial features which are the life and soul of my workflow: Targeted browsing, File renaming,  QuickTags and Status. I will explain how I use each of these features to download, store, rename and organize my PDF files; then, how I will incorporate the organized PDF into the Devonthink hemisphere using Hazel as a glue.

I am not going to explain how to do all the importing and referencing process in Sente. That is left for the user manual; my task here is to show how to use what I call above the crucial features and getting things done.

Let me start from setting up the Sente library:

## File naming

The library is setup to store PDF attachments inside the Sente bundle. Setting up the library inside the bundle is very important for syncing the library to iPad via the Sente server.

The attachments will also be named as:

[First author Last name] [Year of publication] [Title of publication]

The file naming  is  important because I find some of the PDF files hard to read inside Sente; hence, I have to open them in acrobat. If you have the files properly named based on the author and title, getting the file is just a matter of second, specially if you are using Alfred.

## Targeted browsing

After you setup your library, the next step is to search files and download or import them into your sente library. There are two ways of getting your PDF files into Sente library; both of which support of-the cuff-setting up the reference of the file. The first method is directly downloading from the internet. Sente has this wonderful feature called targeted browsing. The main advantage of the targeted browsing is you have a choice of downloading bibliography information from a plethora of websites; you are not limited to Google Scholar or MedPub (the main weakness of Mendeley, by the way is absence of such a choice; it can download only from Scholar and medPub). Even if Google scholar is one of the greatest data sources on the internet, the data you retrieve from it are usually incomplete. Many people like MedPub. But, for my field, MedPub is irrelevant. Therefore, for articles, I havn’t found any better source than Google Scholar.  To get both the reference and the PDF file from Google scholar to your library, what you do is first import the reference information into your library by clicking the red button in   scholar website; and then, download the related PDF file. I am sure you know how to do this; I don’t need to explain it in depth.

The second approach is to have the PDF file in your disk; and then drag it or import it into your library. Sente will present you a window to add reference information to your PDF file. At this point, what I usually do is: highlight the title of the PDF file and take the title to my favorite search engines. For research articles, there is no better choice than Scholar.

As for books, thanks for their ISBN numbers, there are a lot of choices; WorldCat being one of the most popular. I used to retrieve the data for the books from WorldCat for a while.  But, after some time, I leaned that it sometimes confuses Affiliations metadata with Author. Therefore, I have been looking for alternative sources for retrieving bibliography information for books. Google Books is quite good; but Sente Targeted browsing seems to have some kind of difficulty to retrieve data from google books; takes longer time. Finally, , to my surprise,  I discovered the library of Stanford has the cleanest data; and Sente is very happy about it.

The template you develop to modify your targeted browsing in Sente is called Autolink Templates. Here is how I setup my Autolink Template:

Autolink Templates in Sente

 

## Quicktags

Quicktags: are the tools for organizing your research resources into groups. I have three major classes of Quicktags:

a) the Class: this is the class of quicktags that I assign to the PDF’s inherent classes. I assign these tags to classify the paper into the basic inherent classes of my field: Linguistics. Linguistics has many sub-branches if study; and sub-topics of research. Therefore, whenever I download a PDF paper, I assign these classes into the paper so that I can easily search and look at whenever I am looking at certain sub-topics. I for example use tags like Syntax, Semantics, Pragmatics, Phonology, plus sub-topics such as  VPs, PP, RC, DP under Syntax which what they are. I also have hierarchies of tags for the families of languages that I am interested in.

Afro-Asiatic [Semitic[Classical[Arabic, Hebrew]][Modern]] etc

b) the Project: this is a group of tags that I assign to papers on project basis. The projects are usually transient tasks that I plan, finish and move on to the next project. They could be part of the specific Class; they can also run across many classes. I assign these transient tags to the papers I am downloading, or on those which are already in my library. I search down my library, google scholar and may other source to combine all the resources to finish under one project using these Project tags.

c) the third group of tags is what I call meta tags. They are organizational tags. Whenever print a PDF file, I assign a tag xPrint; whenever I am reading the paper in Acrobat reader, I assign a tag called xAcrobat; or, finished reading the PDF and exporting the annotations of the PDF,  mark it xExport.

The Meta tags are supporters while Project tags are brothers of the Statuses, which I will explain in a moment.

## Statuses:

I basically use Statuses are meta-tags and to track the progress of projects. As you can see from the following snapshot, I have about 12 Statuses that I assign to my PDF files:

Statuses in Sente

– To be read nextis for example a status that I assign to a paper that I want to read just immediately after I finish reading the current paper.

  • Must read: is another status for a paper need to be read by hook or crook before I finish my PhD; a paper that I believe can offer a significant and profound insight to my research.
  • Repelling is on the negative side: a paper hard to read; or written in a bad language; the point is: I am dropping that paper; and might delete it from my library completely.

you get the idea

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6 thoughts on “Workflow with Sente, Devonthink, Scrivener using Hazel and Dropbox as glue: part 1

  1. Hi,

    I’ve been rethinking about my own workflow, and I’ve more or less decided to work with this exact same one. The largest issue I have with Sente is figuring out the best method for OCRing texts that Sente doesn’t recognize (or that haven’t been OCRed in the first place) Sente often seems to be hit or miss for me with texts that can otherwise be selected in, say, Preview. This might be a bit tangential to the current discussion, but I noticed the status “Done in Acrobat” and I was wondering whether you had a similar problem or whether that status was referring to articles annotated before you acquired Sente.

    • Exactly, “Done in Acrobat” is for the articles that Sente can not do; or very uncomfortable to do. As you said some of the PDF formats are not recognized in Sente; that is true and I occasionally experience it. That is one reason for the “Done in Acrobat” status. The other occasion where I stick with Acrobat is when I am reading a long book. Sente, the mac version, so far can not display bookmarks and outlines; creating a pain to navigate through long texts (books). Therefore, I have to immediately fire acrobat whenever I face such files.

  2. I wonder what happens to notes in nvALT: the flow chart doesn’t show any outgoing connections except “Dropbox”. Which tool plays which part?

    Also, do you use nested tags a lot? I used tag hierarchies like webdev:css:links a while ago, but I found that it doesn’t have any advantage over the resulting unison sot of the three tags webdev, css, and links. Can you elaborate on your language studies some more so we can get a feeling for your needs?

    • Sorry if the picture is not clear. The nvALT folder gets indexed in Devonthink via the Dropbox folder. DT is where all the notes from all different directions come together ultimately. Look at the second part how the PDF annotations done in Sente are exported and ultimately indexed DT.

      As for the hierarchy of tags, yes, they are better than linear tags because assigning just one tag; say "Arabic" in the hierarchical tag to a file automatically assigns the higher tags such as "Semitic" and "Afro-Asiatic" tags. That is economical. You don't have to write 3 tags all the time you download a paper on Arabic. You just assign just one, and get the rest for free. But, for me, the most important advantage of the hierarchical tag is the ability to delimit my search. If I want to search how definite articles are marked in "Semitic" languages, my search will be delimited to that tag hierarchy (in the project mood). Look at the second post to understand the project mood. So far as I understand, linear tags can not hook you up to the project mood; hence the search delimitation.

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